Doing more for racial justice

I’m the grandson of a Port of Seattle police officer, the nephew of a Washington State Trooper, and the son of a Snohomish County Detention Chief. The Black men in my family were all engaged in some form of law enforcement, and throughout my lifetime, I’ve seen law enforcement officers be a force for good in communities. But I’ve also borne witness to injustices that have shaken my faith in our criminal justice system. In my work at Google.org, I help identify causes and organizations that aim to ultimately help correct many of these injustices.

Since 2015, Google.org has committed more than $5 million to nonprofits advancing racial justice, and we’ve aimed to get proximate and better understand how racial bias can lead to exclusion from opportunity. Today we’re doubling our previous commitment, and investing $11.5 million in new grants to organizations across the country working to reform our criminal justice system.

Mass incarceration is a huge issue in the United States, and a major area of focus for our grants. The U.S. penal population has exploded, growing by 400 percent since 1984 to more than 2 million today, with Black men sentenced at over five times the rate of white men. We have the highest rate of incarceration in the world, dwarfing the rates of every developed country and even surpassing those in highly repressive regimes.

Videos of police shooting unarmed people of color have woken many of us up to the impact that racism and internalized bias have on black and brown communities. But we have almost no data on police behavior and criminal sentencing at a national level. Individual agencies and court systems keep track of some information, but aggregated reporting is nearly nonexistent and the data is often not complete enough to identify potential bias. Each agency collects and reports data in their own way, making comparisons between jurisdictions nearly impossible.

MeanUse Force Rates.png

The average rate of police use of force for Black residents is 2.5 times as high as the overall rate and 3.6 times as high as the rate for White residents (Source: CPE’s report The Science of Justice)

We believe better data can be can be part of the solution, which is why we’re investing in organizations using data and evidence to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system. We’re giving $5 million to support the Center for Policing Equity (CPE), which partners with police agencies and communities by bringing together data science, trainings and policy reforms to address racial disparity. This intersection gives CPE a unique opportunity to both identify the cause of problems, and propose concrete solutions. CPE’s National Justice Database is the first in the nation to track national statistics on police behavior, including stops and use of force, and standardizes data collection across many of the country’s police departments. Soon, Google engineers will be volunteering their time and skills with CPE to help build and improve this platform.

We’re also supporting two organizations in California that are focused on ways that data can help bring about more equity in our court systems. Our $1.5 million grant to Measures for Justice aims to create a first-of-its-kind web platform that allows anyone to get a snapshot of how their local justice system treats people based on their offense history and across different categories of race/ethnicity, sex, indigent status and age. And $500,000 to the W. Haywood Burns Institute is helping to ensure this data across each of California’s 58 counties is accessible to criminal justice reform organizations so they can make data-informed decisions.

The goal of these efforts is a society where everyone, regardless of race, is ensured an equal outcome under the law. That’s why we’re also supporting Impact Justice with $1 million for their national Restorative Justice Project, an effort that aims to keep 1,900 youth, primarily youth of color, out of the juvenile justice system. And a $650K grant to JustLeadershipUSA will support their efforts to train a growing national network of formerly incarcerated leaders from across the country to lead reform efforts at the local, state and national level. We’ve also reinvested in organizations working to provide services to people who were formerly incarcerated and their communities like Defy Ventures, Center for Employment Opportunities, Silicon Valley De-Bug and Code for America.

We believe that these 10 organizations can create meaningful change around racial, social and criminal justice in the U.S., and we hope that our grants will provide resources and support to bring about this much-needed change. But there’s also a lot going on here at Google in the fight for justice and against bias. Our Black Googler Network (BGN) is a group of employees that fosters success in the Black community at Google and beyond. They lead mentorship programs and events, and have also driven social justice movements across the company, including solidarity for #BlackLivesMatter. Last November, the BGN held Google’s first ever “Blackout Week,” where they helped raise $70,000 for four organizations leading the Movement for Black Lives, and helped sponsor community screenings of the Netflix documentary “13th” in 12 Google offices across the country.

GoogleOrg Screening.jpg

Google.org’s community screening of the documentary 13th at Google’s Mountain View HQ  

A person’s race should not determine how they are treated by the law. We’re proud to support these organizations, and we hope that their focus on data and community-driven solutions to will bring us closer to a more just society.

Doing more for racial justice

I’m the grandson of a Port of Seattle police officer, the nephew of a Washington State Trooper, and the son of a Snohomish County Detention Chief. The Black men in my family were all engaged in some form of law enforcement, and throughout my lifetime, I’ve seen law enforcement officers be a force for good in communities. But I’ve also borne witness to injustices that have shaken my faith in our criminal justice system. In my work at Google.org, I help identify causes and organizations that aim to ultimately help correct many of these injustices.

Since 2015, Google.org has committed more than $5 million to nonprofits advancing racial justice, and we’ve aimed to get proximate and better understand how racial bias can lead to exclusion from opportunity. Today we’re doubling our previous commitment, and investing $11.5 million in new grants to organizations across the country working to reform our criminal justice system.

Mass incarceration is a huge issue in the United States, and a major area of focus for our grants. The U.S. penal population has exploded, growing by 400 percent since 1984 to more than 2 million today, with Black men sentenced at over five times the rate of white men. We have the highest rate of incarceration in the world, dwarfing the rates of every developed country and even surpassing those in highly repressive regimes.

Videos of police shooting unarmed people of color have woken many of us up to the impact that racism and internalized bias have on black and brown communities. But we have almost no data on police behavior and criminal sentencing at a national level. Individual agencies and court systems keep track of some information, but aggregated reporting is nearly nonexistent and the data is often not complete enough to identify potential bias. Each agency collects and reports data in their own way, making comparisons between jurisdictions nearly impossible.

MeanUse Force Rates.png

The average rate of police use of force for Black residents is 2.5 times as high as the overall rate and 3.6 times as high as the rate for White residents (Source: CPE’s report The Science of Justice)

We believe better data can be can be part of the solution, which is why we’re investing in organizations using data and evidence to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system. We’re giving $5 million to support the Center for Policing Equity (CPE), which partners with police agencies and communities by bringing together data science, trainings and policy reforms to address racial disparity. This intersection gives CPE a unique opportunity to both identify the cause of problems, and propose concrete solutions. CPE’s National Justice Database is the first in the nation to track national statistics on police behavior, including stops and use of force, and standardizes data collection across many of the country’s police departments. Soon, Google engineers will be volunteering their time and skills with CPE to help build and improve this platform.

We’re also supporting two organizations in California that are focused on ways that data can help bring about more equity in our court systems. Our $1.5 million grant to Measures for Justice aims to create a first-of-its-kind web platform that allows anyone to get a snapshot of how their local justice system treats people based on their offense history and across different categories of race/ethnicity, sex, indigent status and age. And $500,000 to the W. Haywood Burns Institute is helping to ensure this data across each of California’s 58 counties is accessible to criminal justice reform organizations so they can make data-informed decisions.

The goal of these efforts is a society where everyone, regardless of race, is ensured an equal outcome under the law. That’s why we’re also supporting Impact Justice with $1 million for their national Restorative Justice Project, an effort that aims to keep 1,900 youth, primarily youth of color, out of the juvenile justice system. And a $650K grant to JustLeadershipUSA will support their efforts to train a growing national network of formerly incarcerated leaders from across the country to lead reform efforts at the local, state and national level. We’ve also reinvested in organizations working to provide services to people who were formerly incarcerated and their communities like Defy Ventures, Center for Employment Opportunities, Silicon Valley De-Bug and Code for America.

We believe that these 10 organizations can create meaningful change around racial, social and criminal justice in the U.S., and we hope that our grants will provide resources and support to bring about this much-needed change. But there’s also a lot going on here at Google in the fight for justice and against bias. Our Black Googler Network (BGN) is a group of employees that fosters success in the Black community at Google and beyond. They lead mentorship programs and events, and have also driven social justice movements across the company, including solidarity for #BlackLivesMatter. Last November, the BGN held Google’s first ever “Blackout Week,” where they helped raise $70,000 for four organizations leading the Movement for Black Lives, and helped sponsor community screenings of the Netflix documentary “13th” in 12 Google offices across the country.

GoogleOrg Screening.jpg

Google.org’s community screening of the documentary 13th at Google’s Mountain View HQ  

A person’s race should not determine how they are treated by the law. We’re proud to support these organizations, and we hope that their focus on data and community-driven solutions to will bring us closer to a more just society.

Doing more for racial justice

I’m the grandson of a Port of Seattle police officer, the nephew of a Washington State Trooper, and the son of a Snohomish County Detention Chief. The Black men in my family were all engaged in some form of law enforcement, and throughout my lifetime, I’ve seen law enforcement officers be a force for good in communities. But I’ve also borne witness to injustices that have shaken my faith in our criminal justice system. In my work at Google.org, I help identify causes and organizations that aim to ultimately help correct many of these injustices.

Since 2015, Google.org has committed more than $5 million to nonprofits advancing racial justice, and we’ve aimed to get proximate and better understand how racial bias can lead to exclusion from opportunity. Today we’re doubling our previous commitment, and investing $11.5 million in new grants to organizations across the country working to reform our criminal justice system.

Mass incarceration is a huge issue in the United States, and a major area of focus for our grants. The U.S. penal population has exploded, growing by 400 percent since 1984 to more than 2 million today, with Black men sentenced at over five times the rate of white men. We have the highest rate of incarceration in the world, dwarfing the rates of every developed country and even surpassing those in highly repressive regimes.

Videos of police shooting unarmed people of color have woken many of us up to the impact that racism and internalized bias have on black and brown communities. But we have almost no data on police behavior and criminal sentencing at a national level. Individual agencies and court systems keep track of some information, but aggregated reporting is nearly nonexistent and the data is often not complete enough to identify potential bias. Each agency collects and reports data in their own way, making comparisons between jurisdictions nearly impossible.

MeanUse Force Rates.png

The average rate of police use of force for Black residents is 2.5 times as high as the overall rate and 3.6 times as high as the rate for White residents (Source: CPE’s report The Science of Justice)

We believe better data can be can be part of the solution, which is why we’re investing in organizations using data and evidence to reduce racial disparities in the criminal justice system. We’re giving $5 million to support the Center for Policing Equity (CPE), which partners with police agencies and communities by bringing together data science, trainings and policy reforms to address racial disparity. This intersection gives CPE a unique opportunity to both identify the cause of problems, and propose concrete solutions. CPE’s National Justice Database is the first in the nation to track national statistics on police behavior, including stops and use of force, and standardizes data collection across many of the country’s police departments. Soon, Google engineers will be volunteering their time and skills with CPE to help build and improve this platform.

We’re also supporting two organizations in California that are focused on ways that data can help bring about more equity in our court systems. Our $1.5 million grant to Measures for Justice aims to create a first-of-its-kind web platform that allows anyone to get a snapshot of how their local justice system treats people based on their offense history and across different categories of race/ethnicity, sex, indigent status and age. And $500,000 to the W. Haywood Burns Institute is helping to ensure this data across each of California’s 58 counties is accessible to criminal justice reform organizations so they can make data-informed decisions.

The goal of these efforts is a society where everyone, regardless of race, is ensured an equal outcome under the law. That’s why we’re also supporting Impact Justice with $1 million for their national Restorative Justice Project, an effort that aims to keep 1,900 youth, primarily youth of color, out of the juvenile justice system. And a $650K grant to JustLeadershipUSA will support their efforts to train a growing national network of formerly incarcerated leaders from across the country to lead reform efforts at the local, state and national level. We’ve also reinvested in organizations working to provide services to people who were formerly incarcerated and their communities like Defy Ventures, Center for Employment Opportunities, Silicon Valley De-Bug and Code for America.

We believe that these 10 organizations can create meaningful change around racial, social and criminal justice in the U.S., and we hope that our grants will provide resources and support to bring about this much-needed change. But there’s also a lot going on here at Google in the fight for justice and against bias. Our Black Googler Network (BGN) is a group of employees that fosters success in the Black community at Google and beyond. They lead mentorship programs and events, and have also driven social justice movements across the company, including solidarity for #BlackLivesMatter. Last November, the BGN held Google’s first ever “Blackout Week,” where they helped raise $70,000 for four organizations leading the Movement for Black Lives, and helped sponsor community screenings of the Netflix documentary “13th” in 12 Google offices across the country.

GoogleOrg Screening.jpg

Google.org’s community screening of the documentary 13th at Google’s Mountain View HQ  

A person’s race should not determine how they are treated by the law. We’re proud to support these organizations, and we hope that their focus on data and community-driven solutions to will bring us closer to a more just society.

Bringing the We Love You Project to Google Arts & Culture

Editor’s Note: Today we’re launching a new exhibit in Google Arts & Culture featuring the work of photographer Bryon Summers. We’ve invited Summers to share more about the We Love You Project in this post.

In 2016 I set out to create 1,000+ portraits of Black men of all ages.

From the moment we’re born, Black boys are bombarded with images that strip us of our humanity. We see Black bodies cast as criminals and predators, implicitly urging viewers of all stripes to believe these characterizations as unwavering truths of Black male identity. What we don’t see are the smiling, reassuring, loving faces of our sons, brothers, cousins, husbands and fathers. With the We Love You Project, I wanted to show that even though we may feel as if our bodies are under attack, we’re still part of a larger community that loves and supports us.

WLYProject_EvanWard_BtS_Blog.jpg

Bryon takes a photo of Evan Ward at Google’s Mountain View campus

The We Love You Project has now surpassed 500 participants, and the groundswell of support and joyful participation from Black men across the country has been one of the most powerful experiences of my artistic career. As we continue to photograph Black men and boys, we want to ensure that our work continues to be seen and drives meaningful conversations about many Black men’s experiences in America. This is why we’ve partnered with Google Arts & Culture to create a digital gallery of more than 500 portraits from the series.

Google also invited us to photograph Black Googlers at its Mountain View headquarters—another huge turning point for the project. Not only is Google helping us reach our goal of 1,000 portraits, the company’s participation reflects its commitment to diversity and to being an ally of the Black community.

We Love You lets viewers connect with Black men candidly and up close—in moments of vulnerability as well as levity. The photos reveal not just who we are now, but who we’ve been in the past and who we aspire to be tomorrow. Above all, the project convinces me of the great possibilities ahead, not just for Black men, but for all people. A thousand is only the beginning.

Bringing the We Love You Project to Google Arts & Culture

Editor’s Note: Today we’re launching a new exhibit in Google Arts & Culture featuring the work of photographer Bryon Summers. We’ve invited Summers to share more about the We Love You Project in this post.

In 2016 I set out to create 1,000+ portraits of Black men of all ages.

From the moment we’re born, Black boys are bombarded with images that strip us of our humanity. We see Black bodies cast as criminals and predators, implicitly urging viewers of all stripes to believe these characterizations as unwavering truths of Black male identity. What we don’t see are the smiling, reassuring, loving faces of our sons, brothers, cousins, husbands and fathers. With the We Love You Project, I wanted to show that even though we may feel as if our bodies are under attack, we’re still part of a larger community that loves and supports us.

WLYProject_EvanWard_BtS_Blog.jpg

Bryon takes a photo of Evan Ward at Google’s Mountain View campus

The We Love You Project has now surpassed 500 participants, and the groundswell of support and joyful participation from Black men across the country has been one of the most powerful experiences of my artistic career. As we continue to photograph Black men and boys, we want to ensure that our work continues to be seen and drives meaningful conversations about many Black men’s experiences in America. This is why we’ve partnered with Google Arts & Culture to create a digital gallery of more than 500 portraits from the series.

Google also invited us to photograph Black Googlers at its Mountain View headquarters—another huge turning point for the project. Not only is Google helping us reach our goal of 1,000 portraits, the company’s participation reflects its commitment to diversity and to being an ally of the Black community.

We Love You lets viewers connect with Black men candidly and up close—in moments of vulnerability as well as levity. The photos reveal not just who we are now, but who we’ve been in the past and who we aspire to be tomorrow. Above all, the project convinces me of the great possibilities ahead, not just for Black men, but for all people. A thousand is only the beginning.

Celebrating Black History Month

Every February Googlers come together to celebrate and reflect on the many contributions the Black community has made to our company, the United States, and the world. We’re starting off Black History Month with a Doodle honoring the life and work of Edmonia Lewis, the first woman of both African- and Native-American descent to achieve international praise for her work as a sculptor.

celebrating-edmonia-lewis-doodle.jpg

Lewis, whose Native American name was Wildfire, was born in upstate New York in 1844. As a woman of color, she faced significant adversity and discrimination in her quest to become a sculptor, but she persevered, eventually moving to Europe where she found her first success in a solo exhibition that paid tribute to American abolitionists.

EdmonaLewis1.width-800.png

Lewis’ lifelong dedication to her craft has been a source of inspiration for many, and we’re honored to display her work, which is archived at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in DC, in a new exhibit from Google Arts & Culture. Throughout BHM, we’ll be adding additional exhibits featuring Black modern photography and dance—part of our continued work to make Google Arts & Culture more inclusive of America’s diverse history and culture, and to make it accessible for everyone.

Stay tuned this February for more on what we’re doing to celebrate and support Black Googlers and the Black community.

Celebrating Black History Month

Every February Googlers come together to celebrate and reflect on the many contributions the Black community has made to our company, the United States, and the world. We’re starting off Black History Month with a Doodle honoring the life and work of Edmonia Lewis, the first woman of both African- and Native-American descent to achieve international praise for her work as a sculptor.

celebrating-edmonia-lewis-doodle.jpg

Lewis, whose Native American name was Wildfire, was born in upstate New York in 1844. As a woman of color, she faced significant adversity and discrimination in her quest to become a sculptor, but she persevered, eventually moving to Europe where she found her first success in a solo exhibition that paid tribute to American abolitionists.

EdmonaLewis1.png

Lewis’ lifelong dedication to her craft has been a source of inspiration for many, and we’re honored to display her work, which is archived at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in DC, in a new exhibit from Google Arts & Culture. Throughout BHM, we’ll be adding additional exhibits featuring Black modern photography and dance—part of our continued work to make Google Arts & Culture more inclusive of America’s diverse history and culture, and to make it accessible for everyone.

Stay tuned this February for more on what we’re doing to celebrate and support Black Googlers and the Black community.

2016 Year in Review

2016 was a year of many things – changes, challenges and opportunities. But above all else, 2016 was a year where you continued your work to change the world; to bring the world a little closer to finding common ground amongst peace, progress, and innovation.

As 2016 comes to a close, Google for Nonprofits took one final opportunity to reflect on a year past and look forward to the year ahead.  So without further ado, here are the top posts from 2016 from your friends at Google for Nonprofits.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.11 PM.png

From LA to Tokyo: YouTube Spaces opens production studios to nonprofits free of charge

From LA to London, Tokyo to Mumbai, Berlin to São Paulo, YouTube Spaces empower nonprofits by providing them exclusive access to the best production resources around — all at no cost. All enrolled nonprofits with 1,000 or more subscribers are now eligible to apply for production access at YouTube Spaces.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.53 PM.png

Unlocking your nonprofit’s data insights: Linking Ad Grants and Google Analytics

So you’re using AdGrants – our in-kind advertising solution for nonprofits which allows you to run text ads on Google Search – and you’re looking for more insights? Google Analytics is your go-to tool for providing insights into user behavior, which can be used to inform Google AdGrants, as well as website optimization. By syncing data and using AdGrants & Analytics in tandem, you can boost the quality of traffic reaching your site and increase the chance of visitors completing a meaningful action on your NGO’s page.

Benefits of Linking your Google Analytics and Adwords Accounts

Four ways to keep your nonprofit safe & secure online

“How do we keep our nonprofit (and the community we serve) safe and secure online?” In 2016, we partnered with Google’s User Advocacy Group to share four smart tips to keep your nonprofit, your users, and you safe online.

safety_security_g4np.width-600.png

What do you and your nonprofit want to learn in the new year? Leave a comment below, and we’ll work on learning together in 2017.

Lastly, we so appreciate all nonprofits’ unwavering dedication to changing the world. We wish all nonprofits and their communities a peaceful holiday season and a joyful new year.

To see if your nonprofit is eligible to participate, review the Google for Nonprofits eligibility guidelines. Google for Nonprofits offers organizations like yours free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants, YouTube for Nonprofits and more. These tools can help you reach new donors and volunteers, work more efficiently, and tell your nonprofit’s story. Learn more and enroll here.

2016 Year in Review

2016 was a year of many things – changes, challenges and opportunities. But above all else, 2016 was a year where you continued your work to change the world; to bring the world a little closer to finding common ground amongst peace, progress, and innovation.

As 2016 comes to a close, Google for Nonprofits took one final opportunity to reflect on a year past and look forward to the year ahead.  So without further ado, here are the top posts from 2016 from your friends at Google for Nonprofits.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.11 PM.png

From LA to Tokyo: YouTube Spaces opens production studios to nonprofits free of charge

From LA to London, Tokyo to Mumbai, Berlin to São Paulo, YouTube Spaces empower nonprofits by providing them exclusive access to the best production resources around — all at no cost. All enrolled nonprofits with 1,000 or more subscribers are now eligible to apply for production access at YouTube Spaces.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.53 PM.png

Unlocking your nonprofit’s data insights: Linking Ad Grants and Google Analytics

So you’re using AdGrants – our in-kind advertising solution for nonprofits which allows you to run text ads on Google Search – and you’re looking for more insights? Google Analytics is your go-to tool for providing insights into user behavior, which can be used to inform Google AdGrants, as well as website optimization. By syncing data and using AdGrants & Analytics in tandem, you can boost the quality of traffic reaching your site and increase the chance of visitors completing a meaningful action on your NGO’s page.

Benefits of Linking your Google Analytics and Adwords Accounts

Four ways to keep your nonprofit safe & secure online

“How do we keep our nonprofit (and the community we serve) safe and secure online?” In 2016, we partnered with Google’s User Advocacy Group to share four smart tips to keep your nonprofit, your users, and you safe online.

safety_security_g4np.width-600.png

What do you and your nonprofit want to learn in the new year? Leave a comment below, and we’ll work on learning together in 2017.

Lastly, we so appreciate all nonprofits’ unwavering dedication to changing the world. We wish all nonprofits and their communities a peaceful holiday season and a joyful new year.

To see if your nonprofit is eligible to participate, review the Google for Nonprofits eligibility guidelines. Google for Nonprofits offers organizations like yours free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants, YouTube for Nonprofits and more. These tools can help you reach new donors and volunteers, work more efficiently, and tell your nonprofit’s story. Learn more and enroll here.

2016 Year in Review

2016 was a year of many things – changes, challenges and opportunities. But above all else, 2016 was a year where you continued your work to change the world; to bring the world a little closer to finding common ground amongst peace, progress, and innovation.

As 2016 comes to a close, Google for Nonprofits took one final opportunity to reflect on a year past and look forward to the year ahead.  So without further ado, here are the top posts from 2016 from your friends at Google for Nonprofits.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.11 PM.png

From LA to Tokyo: YouTube Spaces opens production studios to nonprofits free of charge

From LA to London, Tokyo to Mumbai, Berlin to São Paulo, YouTube Spaces empower nonprofits by providing them exclusive access to the best production resources around — all at no cost. All enrolled nonprofits with 1,000 or more subscribers are now eligible to apply for production access at YouTube Spaces.

Screen Shot 2016-12-22 at 3.54.53 PM.png

Unlocking your nonprofit’s data insights: Linking Ad Grants and Google Analytics

So you’re using AdGrants – our in-kind advertising solution for nonprofits which allows you to run text ads on Google Search – and you’re looking for more insights? Google Analytics is your go-to tool for providing insights into user behavior, which can be used to inform Google AdGrants, as well as website optimization. By syncing data and using AdGrants & Analytics in tandem, you can boost the quality of traffic reaching your site and increase the chance of visitors completing a meaningful action on your NGO’s page.

Benefits of Linking your Google Analytics and Adwords Accounts

Four ways to keep your nonprofit safe & secure online

“How do we keep our nonprofit (and the community we serve) safe and secure online?” In 2016, we partnered with Google’s User Advocacy Group to share four smart tips to keep your nonprofit, your users, and you safe online.

safety_security_g4np.width-600.png

What do you and your nonprofit want to learn in the new year? Leave a comment below, and we’ll work on learning together in 2017.

Lastly, we so appreciate all nonprofits’ unwavering dedication to changing the world. We wish all nonprofits and their communities a peaceful holiday season and a joyful new year.

To see if your nonprofit is eligible to participate, review the Google for Nonprofits eligibility guidelines. Google for Nonprofits offers organizations like yours free access to Google tools like Gmail, Google Calendar, Google Drive, Google Ad Grants, YouTube for Nonprofits and more. These tools can help you reach new donors and volunteers, work more efficiently, and tell your nonprofit’s story. Learn more and enroll here.